GradPost#6: Good Luck. Take this.

I feel like I have so much to say about this, but I’ll have to keep it short.  I couldn’t agree more with Leo Babauta’s “9 Essential Skills Kids Should Learn,” post about why each of of these skills are so crucial for preparing the next generation for the unpredictable future ahead.  http://zenhabits.net/kid-skills/

1. Asking questions

2. Solving problems

3. Tackling projects

4. Finding passion

5. Independence

6. Being happy on their own

7. Compassion

8. Tolerance

9. Dealing with change

I was recently talking to someone about how grateful I am to be part of a grad program with so many progressive and passionate teachers.  I also thought about how great it has been that most of our professors have experience abroad working among foreign cultures.  I thought about how differently my education might be if I were taking a graduate program within the United States- not that anything would be wrong with that.  But the odds of being instructed by professors who have never left the country, or even their state, is a bit more likely.  The odds of being among fellow peers who may not have ever left the area, nor plan to, also seem to be higher.  Again, not that there’s anything wrong with this, and I’m not equating travel with progressiveness.   But I wonder.

Korea generally provides greater job security for teachers and takes good care of them, compared to the US.  It’s great that they do here, but there’s also something to be said about the complacency most teachers begin to experience after a few years.  The school I work for, is one of the more reputable schools in Seoul, but in many ways I’d say, its pedagogical methods are stuck in the past.

Babauta makes a point that we are, or should be, learning along with our kids as we go.  I have a tough time standing by and watching how some choose to deliberately ‘stand still’ rather than advancing forward.  I can see how complacency happens without realizing it at first, though.

I hope this blog will keep me motivated and act as an example for friends, family and followers for life long learning.

 

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